NBI probes leak on PGMA’s hospitalization RE: Breast implant

Pres. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

Pres. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

MANILA – The National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) began Monday a probe into the leaked information on President Arroyo’s hospital stay at the Asian Hospital last week.

The NBI has already taken statements from three individuals at the hospital regarding the possible violation of the rule on doctor-patient confidentiality.

Meanwhile, all Monday appointments of the President were cancelled, with Palace officials saying it is still in connection with her self-imposed quarantine and her recent hospital stay.

Press Secretary Cerge Remonde earlier denied that Malacañang ordered the Asian Hospital and Medical Center in Alabang, Muntinlupa City to find out who told media about medical procedures done to the President while she was on self-imposed quarantine at the hospital last week.

“It is not true [that we ordered it]. If Asian Hospital is doing an investigation, they are doing it on their own and we did not request it,” Remonde told radio dzMM.

The press secretary said the President will continue to visit the medical facility because her gynecologist works there. Mrs. Arroyo also undergoes medical check-ups at the St. Luke’s Medical Center in Quezon City.

He also refused to comment on Mrs. Arroyo’s failure to attend a scheduled visit to the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) in Makati City for a signing ceremony. A statement on the PSE website read: “Please be notified that Her Excellency President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo’s visit to PSE Ayala on Monday, July 6, 2009, is canceled.”

Remonde has been under fire since last week after he denied and then later clarified news reports that Mrs. Arroyo had checked in at the prestigious hospital to have her breast implants removed. “Si Presidente ba mukha na iyong tipo ng babae na magpapaganun (Is the President the type of woman who would do that [breast augmentation])?” the press secretary told reporters.

He later made an about-face about the breast implants, saying that she had them done 20 years ago. He denied, however, that these were the reason why she was hospitalized.

Palace officials earlier said Mrs. Arroyo volunteered to quarantine herself after a two-week trip despite relaxed Influenza A (H1N1) quarantine guidelines from the Department of Health. It was later learned that Mrs. Arroyo attended the golden wedding anniversary of a top foreign affairs official before going to hospital.

Remonde insisted that Mrs. Arroyo checked in at the hospital for self-quarantine, “and at the same time, to take the opportunity to get complete medical check-ups.”

She said the President was declared in good health after biopsies were conducted on lumps found on her breast and groin.

“The result of the biopsy is negative. The President is in good health. That’s the best proof of her health,” he said, adding that she is scheduled to meet her Cabinet on Tuesday,

He said Mrs. Arroyo will again be leaving the country to attend a meeting of foreign leaders at th 15th Non-Aligned Movement Meeting from July 15 to 16 in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm-el-Sheikh.

Another Bill Clinton Scandal

There are reports from a local newspaper in Argentina as well as the Washington Post that Bill Clinton, after a fundraiser, had a little “private” party at a strip club. Just because his wife is Secretary of State, that doesn’t mean Bill Clinton can’t visit an Argentine stripper and pay off bouncers at the strip club so he can have a completely private strip show before dining with the country’s president.

The place that he enjoyed the festivies is called El Cocodrilo, and apparently he had a decent time and got a table dance from Andrea Rincón ( see picture below) and probably some herpes. Can’t really blame the former president after all he has been through? The least he can do is get a little dance from a local South American stripper. His wife is a busy lady as Secretary of State and all. Not to mention that I don’t think Hillary has giving him any since 1996. The report, printed in mainstream newsoutlets The Washington Post and The Daily Mail, is all the talk in South and Latin America:

Bill Clinton allegedly paid $1000 to close the VIP areas to have a private “baile hot” (strip show) by Andrea Rincon. The chick in question reported to the Argentine Press that she received US$1000, which converts to roughly 3700 Argentine pesos…

Bill Clinton was on a private visit to Argentina on behalf of his non-profit, Clinton Global Initiative. After an event, Clinton along with some of his buddies, to the city’s “red zone,” where they ended up at the Crocodile Night Club, a popular strip joint.

It was there where Bill Clinton took a liking to a dancer named Andrea Rincón, who is a pop culture sex bomb in Argentina. Clinton became entranced and asked for a “private” performance from the Latin firecracker.


Clinton later dined with President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and her husband, former president Néstor Kirchner.Which country will he hit next?! Strippers, prostitutes & high end escorts anxiously await the news!

I have to be honest, the stripper is not all that hot but she is a huge step up from Monica Lewinsky. Clinton really needs to step his game up after Monica Lewinsky. I mean, for Christ sake, he was the most powerful man in the world for 8 years. Why is he choosing to settle for a half-rate stripper? He need to get one of those young hot starlets from Hollywood. Things sure have changed since the good old days of JFK and Marilyn Monroe. Anyway, much like the other woman in the Mark Sanford scandal, Clinton’s stripper friend ran straight to the media. Thus leaving me with one question: Why can’t Argentinean women keep their damn mouths shut when not in use by their lovers? LOL

And to celebrate her new International fame she just posed holding a picture of Bill Clinton: According to the Washington Post story a Clinton spokesman in New York said the story “is completely false. They were at the hotel playing cards with the former and current presidents” and “a small group of staff and friends.”

The former Big Brother Argentina (or Gran Hermano, if you prefer) star Andrea Rincón had, at first, said she and Bill Clinton shared a harmless night of dancing at the Crocodilo cabaret in Argentina, and that, yes, she was paid for her services, but not by Clinton himself.

She has now modified her story to include the fact that the former president offered her $1,000 in return for sex. The way she tells it, she was just hangin’ out, being a famewhore, when someone from Clinton’s entourage came up to her and said that Clinton wanted her to perform a strip tease for him and his buddies in a private room.

Don’t lecture us: Arabs tell Obama

by Jailan Zayan Jailan Zayan

CAIRO (AFP) – “Obama is just a prettier face. I’m sure his intentions are in the right place but I don’t expect much from the man,” a Cairo electrician said on Wednesday as US President Barack Obama began his much-anticipated Middle East trip.

Newspapers, analysts and ordinary Arabs warned Obama — whose election was hailed across the region — against emulating the policies of Bush by lecturing Muslims on democracy, and also urged him to be tough with Israel.

Obama began his tour in Saudi Arabia and will deliver a speech in Cairo on Thursday to the world’s 1.5 billion Muslims, after eight years of fraught ties under his predecessor George W. Bush.

“Don’t be biased towards Israel, don’t interfere in countries’ internal affairs and don’t give lessons in democracy,” said an editorial in Egypt‘s state-owned Rose El-Youssef newspaper.

The chief editor of Egypt’s state-owned Al-Ahram, Ossama Saraya, said Obama faced demands from his team to “put pressure on the Muslim world under the pretext of democratisation and respect for human rights.

“There’s nothing more absurd than putting more pressure on the Arab-Muslim world,” Saraya said.

Washington’s key Arab allies Egypt and Saudi Arabia have repeatedly come under criticism from international rights organisations for their poor human rights records.

“He can’t help the Palestinians because of the closeness of ties between Israel and America. He can’t improve the situation here (Egypt) because he’ll never convince the regime to change,” said taxi drive Mohammed Abdullah.”

Hamas, the Islamist rulers of the Gaza Strip boycotted by the West as a terrorist group, urged Obama to put “real pressure” on Israel.

“We will judge this visit on the basis of what he will say and concrete measures that he will take,” spokesman Fawzi Barhum said.

In Amman, the Jordan Times hoped that Obama — whose electoral promise of change has grabbed hearts in the troubled Middle East — should deliver on his pledge.

“If Obama fails in his mission of peace, the parties, and the world, might just as well prepare for more suffering and turmoil.”

In Lebanon, where Sunday’s parliamentary election will be monitored closely by Washington as it pits a Western-backed majority against a Hezbollah-led alliance backed by Syria and Iran, reactions were divided.

The Americans are testing the waters,” said travel agent Moufeed Shbeir. “Obama is trying to take a different route than Bush, but we’ll have to wait and see the results: are they going to bomb Iran?”

In non-Arab Iran, the head of North American Studies at Tehran University said Obama should have gone to the largest Muslim nation in the world — Indonesia — to address Muslims.

“I personally think Obama has made a mistake by choosing Saudi Arabia and Egypt. I don’t think this is going to go down well in the Muslim and Arab world,” Sayed Mohammad Marandi told AFP.

“Symbolically speaking, he could have gone somewhere like Indonesia,” he said.

Saudi Arabia’s Al-Riyadh newspaper warned Muslims against having high expectations. “The Islamic world should not think that Obama is coming to be an ally or a supporter,” an editorial said.

United Arab Emirates Vice President Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum warned Obama that the worsening economic situation would strengthen extremism in the Islamic world.

“Those young men, who are increasingly bored (due to growing unemployment), will be easy prey for those promoting extremism and hostility, mainly against the United States,” he wrote in Al-Khaleej.

Beirut-based analyst Paul Salem, who heads the Carnegie Middle East Centre, said he expected Arabs to be disappointed by Obama’s speech.

“What they want him to say is more than what he’s going to say,” he said.

“They want him to say that he’s going to come down hard on the Israelis, that he’s going to confront the settlement policy and that he’s going to push the Israelis to withdraw from the West Bank.

“Of course that is what every Arab would like to hear.”

On the streets of Cairo, which were getting a facelift ahead of Obama’s speech, citizens were more concerned about traffic jams than regional diplomacy on Wednesday.

“What’s he going to do for us? Lower the price of bread? If he does, then he’s welcome here,” said 38-year-old cafe worker Ahmed Abdel Salam.

New Legal Battle in Guantanamo

By MIKE MELIA, Associated Press Writer Mike Melia, Associated Press Writer

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba – A session of the Guantanamo war crimes court that began Sunday will likely show the difficulties President Barack Obama faces in changing the system and closing the prison by January.

The case in question, of a Canadian charged with killing an American soldier, is stalled by infighting among lawyers.

Other defendants have even more complex legal issues, and officials say the U.S. may have to choose between delaying Guantanamo’s closure or quickly finding somewhere else to hold the trials.

“I don’t think they’ll get a single trial done by January,” said Michael Berrigan, the deputy chief defense counsel for the Guantanamo tribunals. “I don’t think there’s any way.”

The Guantanamo war court sessions are held in the $12 million Expeditionary Legal Complex, a windowless courthouse of corrugated metal and a network of dozens of tents overlooking the Caribbean that the military says can be picked up and moved if necessary.

But the Obama administration has not found a replacement for Guantanamo. So when the judge in the trial of Omar Khadr decided a pretrial hearing was necessary, the military had no choice but to hastily arrange a charter flight to bring attorneys, court personnel and a dozen journalists to the U.S. base in Cuba.

The brief war court session, a closed hearing on Sunday and an open one on Monday, is the first since Obama asked military judges to suspend all proceedings while his administration reviews strategies for prosecuting terrorists.

The main issue before the tribunal is just who has the right to dismiss an attorney. It’s a straightforward question in traditional civilian or military courts but there are not yet many legal precedents at the Guantanamo Military Commissions and still disagreement over the rules.

The chief defense counsel, Air Force Col. Peter Masciola, has been trying since April to fire the lead attorney for Toronto-born Khadr, Navy Lt. Cmdr. William Kuebler, whose aggressive defense and impromptu news conferences have riled military superiors.

Kuebler insists Masciola can’t dismiss him without the trial judge’s permission.

It is nothing new for procedural issues to bog down efforts to prosecute terrorism suspects at Guantanamo. Obama’s pledge to revive the trials with more legal protections for detainees is expected to result in further legal challenges and delays.

“One thing I think we can all agree on is whatever time period you think it will take to complete something at Guantanamo, multiply it by X,” said Charles “Cully” Stimson, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for detainee affairs under President George W. Bush. He said there is no chance of trials wrapping up at Guantanamo by January, although Obama could be planning to move them to the United States.

Obama has not specified where he will hold commissions.

The prospect of moving detainees to the United States, however, appears to be growing more difficult politically as communities across the U.S. come out against holding terror suspects. Relocating the commissions to the U.S. could also threaten the system by making terror suspects eligible for more legal rights.

The chief prosecutor for the Guantanamo trials, Navy Capt. John Murphy, said his office is advising the administration on what a move to the United States would mean for the commissions.

“There are a lot of complicated legal questions that are being analyzed, and that is one of them,” Murphy said.

The U.S. intends to prosecute about 65 of the 240 detainees remaining at Guantanamo, according to Murphy, who said an administration task force is still deciding whether to try them in the commissions or U.S. federal courts. Eleven prisoners are currently facing charges at Guantanamo including five accused of orchestrating the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington.

Khadr, the son of a slain al-Qaida financier, is charged with killing U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer of Albuquerque, New Mexico, with a grenade during a 2002 battle at an al-Qaida stronghold in Afghanistan. Kuebler has said there is evidence to suggest that Khadr didn’t throw the grenade that killed Speer. He also says the Canadian should be treated as a child soldier since he was 15 at the time of the battle.

Kuebler says Masciola wants to dismiss him over strategy disagreements. Masciola won’t discuss the dispute in detail but has called Kuebler’s leadership of the defense team “dysfunctional.”

Once the judge resolves who represents Khadr, he can address a request from Obama for a new 120-day suspension, issued in all pending commissions cases, that would keep them on hold until mid-September.

Obama could still roll back his self-imposed January deadline to close the prison, and there are at least some signs that the military expects Guantanamo to stay open.

A military defense lawyer, Air Force Maj. David Frakt, said his expired security badges for the prison and the commissions were recently renewed until May 2010.